Citizen Kane

skripnikov


Сумбурные заметки о преходящем


Звездные музыканты против радиостанций: история Криса Андерсона
Citizen Kane
skripnikov
Фееричный пример типичного копирастического "луддизма" приводит Крис Андерсон в своей книжке Free, которую я сейчас с удовольствием читаю. Простите, что на английском, переводить сил нет, зато подчеркну особо примечательные места.

In the late 1930s, radio was emerging as a popular entertainment format, but also one that made a mess of the old ways of paying musicians. Encyclopedia.com‘s American Decades describes the dilemma of the time: ― Most radio broadcasts were live, and the musicians and composers were paid for a single performance, but to musicians and composers payment for a single performance alone did not seem fair when that one performance was being received by millions of listeners. Had those millions been packed into one concert hall, the musicians‘ share of the receipts would presumably have been huge. Broadcasters argued that it was impossible to pay licensing fees based on how many listeners tuned in, because no one knew what that number was. But ASCAP, with its near-monopoly on the most popular artists, made the rules: It insisted on royalties of 3 to 5 percent of a station‘s gross advertising revenues in exchange for the right to play music. Worse, it threatened to raise that rate when the contract expired in 1940.

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